@TheEastAfrican

So what if my voters are breaking the law? I need them, Ok?

1 weeks ago, 11:44

One of the more celebrated attributes of elected governments is their responsiveness to popular concerns and wishes.

This is perhaps the strongest reason for arguing that elections are the fittest mechanisms for choosing leaders.

Leaders who are not subject to elections either because they are appointed by someone or by a small clique of people, or those who govern by virtue of who they are by birth, are potentially harmful.

They are apt to govern or rule arbitrarily and not pay attention to the wishes of those under their authority, because after all they are not the ones who chose them.

If there is one good reason why monarchies and hereditary chieftaincies have been toppled and replaced with elected leaderships, this is it. Or at least that is what advocates of “democracy” will tell you.

The beauty of elections is that they enable people who are otherwise powerless to exercise some real power over elected occupants of public office.

In its strongest form, the responsiveness argument envisages ordinary people expressing their desire for things such as healthcare, good schools, paved roads, clean water, safety of person and property and so on, and leaders doing their best to deliver on these popular expectations. If not, voters will use the ballot box to throw them out at the earliest opportunity.

This, of course, is mainly theory. In real life, politics works rather differently. There is, for example, that elections present an opportunity for voters or potential voters to enjoy themselves, make money and receive gifts from people who want to be elected. Here, votes are usually up for sale to the highest bidder.

The rationale is that voters want up front their share of the benefits they believe the elected person will enjoy because of their elevated position.

In contexts where this happens, the last thing they want to hear are elaborate speeches about policy and candidates’ good intentions.

To stand a chance of winning, a candidate must be prepared to spend a fortune. Some go as far as mortgaging their homes.

Uganda’s “highly competitive” politics is a good case study for anyone wishing to look into the details of this phenomenon.

After the elections, voters’ collective expectations from governments are usually modest.

Where they have problems or challenges of a personal nature, such as lacking school fees for their children, money for medical bills, or even to pay for burial expenses in the event of bereavement, things are different.

Here they call on individual leaders, Members of Parliament, especially, for assistance. It is in connection with this that a leader who is not “responsive,” will suffer punishment at the polls.

And this is where we get into tricky territory, where the other side of responsiveness constitutes the dark side of democracy as we practise it.

Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni brought this out well when he visited Nairobi recently to speak at a conference on the Blue Economy.

He told his audience something Ugandans have known for a long time and to which they attribute some of the most glaring failures by ...
Read More


Category: topnews news oped opinion

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@TheEastAfrican

So what if my voters are breaking the law? I need them, Ok?

1 weeks ago, 11:44


One of the more celebrated attributes of elected governments is their responsiveness to popular concerns and wishes.

This is perhaps the strongest reason for arguing that elections are the fittest mechanisms for choosing leaders.

Leaders who are not subject to elections either because they are appointed by someone or by a small clique of people, or those who govern by virtue of who they are by birth, are potentially harmful.

They are apt to govern or rule arbitrarily and not pay attention to the wishes of those under their authority, because after all they are not the ones who chose them.

If there is one good reason why monarchies and hereditary chieftaincies have been toppled and replaced with elected leaderships, this is it. Or at least that is what advocates of “democracy” will tell you.

The beauty of elections is that they enable people who are otherwise powerless to exercise some real power over elected occupants of public office.

In its strongest form, the responsiveness argument envisages ordinary people expressing their desire for things such as healthcare, good schools, paved roads, clean water, safety of person and property and so on, and leaders doing their best to deliver on these popular expectations. If not, voters will use the ballot box to throw them out at the earliest opportunity.

This, of course, is mainly theory. In real life, politics works rather differently. There is, for example, that elections present an opportunity for voters or potential voters to enjoy themselves, make money and receive gifts from people who want to be elected. Here, votes are usually up for sale to the highest bidder.

The rationale is that voters want up front their share of the benefits they believe the elected person will enjoy because of their elevated position.

In contexts where this happens, the last thing they want to hear are elaborate speeches about policy and candidates’ good intentions.

To stand a chance of winning, a candidate must be prepared to spend a fortune. Some go as far as mortgaging their homes.

Uganda’s “highly competitive” politics is a good case study for anyone wishing to look into the details of this phenomenon.

After the elections, voters’ collective expectations from governments are usually modest.

Where they have problems or challenges of a personal nature, such as lacking school fees for their children, money for medical bills, or even to pay for burial expenses in the event of bereavement, things are different.

Here they call on individual leaders, Members of Parliament, especially, for assistance. It is in connection with this that a leader who is not “responsive,” will suffer punishment at the polls.

And this is where we get into tricky territory, where the other side of responsiveness constitutes the dark side of democracy as we practise it.

Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni brought this out well when he visited Nairobi recently to speak at a conference on the Blue Economy.

He told his audience something Ugandans have known for a long time and to which they attribute some of the most glaring failures by ...
Read More

Category: topnews news oped opinion

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1 hours ago, 22:45
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President Uhuru Kenyatta has postponed paying the dowry of his great-grandmother named Musana from Narok after three centuries.The president wanted to pay the bride price to correct the wrongs his gre ...

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@TheStar - By: Imende [email pro ...
Police on the lookout for daytime drunken drivers

Police have introduced daytime alcoblow tests to curb road carnage during the festive season.Inspector of General Joseph Boinnet on Friday said the alcoblow will remain in place even after the festive ...

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@DailyNation - By: Ouma Wanzala
KCSE results out soon as marking ends, analysis begins

Examiner says the results are likely to be issued before December 20. ...

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3 hours ago, 21:13
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Kagame to Burundi: Leave us out of your problems

Rwandan President Paul Kagame has distanced his Government from accusations that it had a role to play in the absence of Burundi at an EAC summit ...

Category: topnews news
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Maasai Council of elders have denied claims being circulated in the social media that they have opposed new currency coins launched by President Uhuru Kenyatta on Tuesday.National organising secretary ...

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