@DailyNation

The World Cup is here, arise Africa's brave 'sports tribes'

3 months ago, 14 June 00:27

By: Charles Onyango-o ...

The 2018 football World Cup is upon us. If you are a hostile alien, the World Cup is, perhaps, the best time to invade Earth.

In 2014, when the tournament was held in Brazil, it’s estimated that 3.5 billion people — nearly half of humans on the planet at that time — watched it.

This year, there will be five African countries in the World Cup: Senegal, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria and Tunisia.

We have come a long way from 1934, when Egypt became the first African country to participate in the World Cup. And 1934 is, therefore, a good date to try and explore how Africa has changed through the World Cup.

That was the time before live broadcast, of course. However, although there are people who are alive in Africa today when the World Cup was played that year, there was absolutely no chance they would have got to watch even a story about it months later.

ECONOMIC LIBERALISATION

That’s because there wasn’t a single TV station in Africa then. The first television service was to be introduced in Morocco 20 years later, in 1954. And Egypt itself had to wait until 1960.

The most interesting World Cup stuff in Africa started happening after the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 and the end of the Cold War a year later.

Africa entered a new wave of political and economic liberalisation that led to the freeing of the airwaves.

So, until the 1994 World Cup, and even then in less than a handful of cases, everyone who watched the tournament live in Africa did so on State-owned TV!

In fact, the first time a reasonably large number of Africans watched the World Cup on a private TV channel was in 1998, when it was held in France.

In that sense, how we watch the World Cup in Africa is also a separate history of our relationship with our governments, their power to mediate our television (and cultural) experience and how that, in turn, has changed.

MIDDLE CLASS FAMILY

An 18-year-old African child from a well-to-do middle class family that has a pay TV subscription that brings him all his football games is, perhaps, most different from his father in his World Cup viewing experience.

But all this would have turned out differently without another political development — the beginning of the end apartheid in South Africa in 1990, with the release of Nelson Mandela after his 27-year spell in prison.

That, and Mandela’s election as president in 1994, led to the South African companies spreading out into once-forbidden territories, and that is how pay TV first arrived in virtually all of Sub-Saharan Africa, via MultiChoice’s DStv.

MultiChoice was really the end of State TV’s control of the World Cup and the further liberalisation of the broadcast space and emergence of a multitude of independent channels the last nail in its coffin.

SPORTS CONSUMPTION

However, MultiChoice led to something that has become a defining feature of sports consumption in Africa; the rise of the sports pub. For ...
Read More


Category: topnews news oped opinion

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@DailyNation

The World Cup is here, arise Africa's brave 'sports tribes'

3 months ago, 14 June 00:27

By: Charles Onyango-o ...

The 2018 football World Cup is upon us. If you are a hostile alien, the World Cup is, perhaps, the best time to invade Earth.

In 2014, when the tournament was held in Brazil, it’s estimated that 3.5 billion people — nearly half of humans on the planet at that time — watched it.

This year, there will be five African countries in the World Cup: Senegal, Egypt, Morocco, Nigeria and Tunisia.

We have come a long way from 1934, when Egypt became the first African country to participate in the World Cup. And 1934 is, therefore, a good date to try and explore how Africa has changed through the World Cup.

That was the time before live broadcast, of course. However, although there are people who are alive in Africa today when the World Cup was played that year, there was absolutely no chance they would have got to watch even a story about it months later.

ECONOMIC LIBERALISATION

That’s because there wasn’t a single TV station in Africa then. The first television service was to be introduced in Morocco 20 years later, in 1954. And Egypt itself had to wait until 1960.

The most interesting World Cup stuff in Africa started happening after the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 and the end of the Cold War a year later.

Africa entered a new wave of political and economic liberalisation that led to the freeing of the airwaves.

So, until the 1994 World Cup, and even then in less than a handful of cases, everyone who watched the tournament live in Africa did so on State-owned TV!

In fact, the first time a reasonably large number of Africans watched the World Cup on a private TV channel was in 1998, when it was held in France.

In that sense, how we watch the World Cup in Africa is also a separate history of our relationship with our governments, their power to mediate our television (and cultural) experience and how that, in turn, has changed.

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An 18-year-old African child from a well-to-do middle class family that has a pay TV subscription that brings him all his football games is, perhaps, most different from his father in his World Cup viewing experience.

But all this would have turned out differently without another political development — the beginning of the end apartheid in South Africa in 1990, with the release of Nelson Mandela after his 27-year spell in prison.

That, and Mandela’s election as president in 1994, led to the South African companies spreading out into once-forbidden territories, and that is how pay TV first arrived in virtually all of Sub-Saharan Africa, via MultiChoice’s DStv.

MultiChoice was really the end of State TV’s control of the World Cup and the further liberalisation of the broadcast space and emergence of a multitude of independent channels the last nail in its coffin.

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However, MultiChoice led to something that has become a defining feature of sports consumption in Africa; the rise of the sports pub. For ...
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