@TheEastAfrican

Lots of money, a large grid, and you’re ready to go nuclear

2 months ago, 12 Oct 12:01

By: Africa Renewal

Years back, nuclear energy was a fancy option limited to the industrialised world. In due course, nuclear could be an energy source for much of Africa, where only South Africa currently has a nuclear power plant.

Governments across the continent are devising development policies to become middle-income countries in the medium term. Socioeconomic growth comes with a rise in energy demand — and a need for a reliable and sustainable energy supply.

For industrialising countries in need of a clean, reliable and cost-effective source of energy, nuclear is an attractive option.

“Africa is hungry for energy, and nuclear power could be part of the answer for an increasing number of countries,” said Mikhail Chudakov, deputy director general and head of the Department of Nuclear Energy at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an organisation that promotes the peaceful use of nuclear technology.

Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria and Sudan have already engaged with the IAEA to assess their readiness to embark on a nuclear programme. Algeria, Tunisia, Uganda and Zambia are also mulling the possibility of nuclear power.

“Energy is the backbone of any strong development,” said Nii Allotey, director of the Nuclear Power Institute at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.

“And where do we get energy from? We have hydro, thermal, fossil fuels, and we have local gas — but these are dwindling. They are limited; fossil fuels could run out by 2030. And, the prices are volatile.

Power to the people

African governments are working to make electricity more widely accessible. Roughly 57 per cent of the population of sub-Saharan Africa does not have access to electricity.

For many, the electricity supply is characterised by frequent power outages, according to the International Energy Agency, an organisation of 30 mostly industrialised countries that have met a set of energy security criteria.

Is Africa ready for nuclear?

“Going nuclear is not something that happens from one day to the next. From the moment a country initiates a nuclear power programme until the first unit becomes operative, years could pass,” said Milko Kovachev, head of the IAEA’s Nuclear Infrastructure Development Section, which works with countries new to nuclear power. “Creating the necessary nuclear infrastructure and building the first nuclear power plant will take at least 10 to 15 years.”

A successful nuclear power programme requires broad political and popular support and a national commitment of at least 100 years, Mr Kovachev added. This includes committing to the entire life cycle of a power plant, from construction through electricity generation and, finally, decommissioning.

In addition to time, there is the issue of costs. Governments and private operators need to make a considerable investment that includes projected waste management and decommissioning costs.

Mr Kovachev points out that “the government’s investment to develop the necessary infrastructure is modest relative to the cost of the first nuclear power plant. But [it] is still in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars.”

Financing nuclear energy

Without proper financing, nuclear is not an option.

“Most countries in Africa will find it difficult to invest this amount of money ...
Read More


Category: oped opinion news topnews

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@TheEastAfrican

Lots of money, a large grid, and you’re ready to go nuclear

2 months ago, 12 Oct 12:01

By: Africa Renewal

Years back, nuclear energy was a fancy option limited to the industrialised world. In due course, nuclear could be an energy source for much of Africa, where only South Africa currently has a nuclear power plant.

Governments across the continent are devising development policies to become middle-income countries in the medium term. Socioeconomic growth comes with a rise in energy demand — and a need for a reliable and sustainable energy supply.

For industrialising countries in need of a clean, reliable and cost-effective source of energy, nuclear is an attractive option.

“Africa is hungry for energy, and nuclear power could be part of the answer for an increasing number of countries,” said Mikhail Chudakov, deputy director general and head of the Department of Nuclear Energy at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an organisation that promotes the peaceful use of nuclear technology.

Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria and Sudan have already engaged with the IAEA to assess their readiness to embark on a nuclear programme. Algeria, Tunisia, Uganda and Zambia are also mulling the possibility of nuclear power.

“Energy is the backbone of any strong development,” said Nii Allotey, director of the Nuclear Power Institute at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.

“And where do we get energy from? We have hydro, thermal, fossil fuels, and we have local gas — but these are dwindling. They are limited; fossil fuels could run out by 2030. And, the prices are volatile.

Power to the people

African governments are working to make electricity more widely accessible. Roughly 57 per cent of the population of sub-Saharan Africa does not have access to electricity.

For many, the electricity supply is characterised by frequent power outages, according to the International Energy Agency, an organisation of 30 mostly industrialised countries that have met a set of energy security criteria.

Is Africa ready for nuclear?

“Going nuclear is not something that happens from one day to the next. From the moment a country initiates a nuclear power programme until the first unit becomes operative, years could pass,” said Milko Kovachev, head of the IAEA’s Nuclear Infrastructure Development Section, which works with countries new to nuclear power. “Creating the necessary nuclear infrastructure and building the first nuclear power plant will take at least 10 to 15 years.”

A successful nuclear power programme requires broad political and popular support and a national commitment of at least 100 years, Mr Kovachev added. This includes committing to the entire life cycle of a power plant, from construction through electricity generation and, finally, decommissioning.

In addition to time, there is the issue of costs. Governments and private operators need to make a considerable investment that includes projected waste management and decommissioning costs.

Mr Kovachev points out that “the government’s investment to develop the necessary infrastructure is modest relative to the cost of the first nuclear power plant. But [it] is still in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars.”

Financing nuclear energy

Without proper financing, nuclear is not an option.

“Most countries in Africa will find it difficult to invest this amount of money ...
Read More

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