@StandardMedia

Kenya's Nairobi looks for new water to ease its growing thirst

3 months ago, 13 June 12:00

By: Reuters

When last year’s prolonged drought saw the water supply to Damaris Kiarie’s Nairobi home rationed, she decided her best bet was to buy water from a local vendor.

It was, she soon learned, a mistake.

After storing two 20-litre drums of water in her kitchen, her son came home from school and poured himself a cup, she remembers.

But “when I arrived home from work, I found him complaining of stomach pains. Within one hour he had diarrhoea.”

She took the 7-year-old to a nearby hospital where medical staff diagnosed cholera, and successfully treated him for it. After that, Kiarie bought a large tank that can store 1,000 litres of piped water for emergency use.

Kiarie said contaminated water causes at least two cases of cholera every month in her neighborhood. Residents of other parts of Kenya’s capital face similar problems, battling shortages caused by drought and broken pipes.

Added to that are the water cartels that tap illegally into the water mains, siphoning off water that they then sell to residents. That water can easily become contaminated.

In short, Nairobi lacks sufficient water, particularly in an era where climate change is bringing less predictable rains.

“When there is a water shortage it is our children who suffer the most. It is good for our leaders to look for alternative sources of water,” said Kiarie.

CAPITAL PROBLEM

Nairobi’s main water source is the Ndakaini dam, which lies about 50 kilometres (30 miles) north of the capital. It supplies about 85 percent of the 500 million litres of water the city uses each day, said Nahashon Muguna, who heads the Nairobi City Water and Sewerage Company.

However, Muguna said, demand is much higher: around 700 million litres. Not surprisingly, residents such as Kiarie wonder what can be done to close the gap.

To that end, the capital is diversifying its sources of water, Nairobi governor Mike Mbuvi Sonko told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“This can help remove cartels who have taken over water businesses in the city,” he said.

Ensuring residents have access to enough water would remove demand for the cartels’ supply, he said.

One solution is to rehabilitate a series of nearby wetlands, dams and swamps both inside and outside the city, and pump the water to the capital. That is something the government is working on together with donors and the private sector.

Many freshwater wetlands have become polluted or have been encroached on over the years.

Previous efforts to improve water systems for Nairobi have included a $35 million rehabiliation of rivers in the Nairobi area, and the improvement of the Nairobi dam as part of a regeneration project in the capital’s infamous Kibera slum.

Although some of the water being brought in is not fit as drinking water, it could be used for sewerage, construction and irrigation, said Nixon Korir, a member of parliament for Lang’ata, a suburb in the capital.

“This can help reduce the amount of fresh water used for enterprises, and increase the volumes families can ...
Read More


Category: business news

Suggested

13 hours ago, 21:05
@DailyNation - By: Brian Moke Ogaro ...
Steps to becoming an organic grower

To shift to organic farming, there is usually a transition period of 36 months prior to harvesting the first crop that can be labelled as organic. ...

Category: topnews news business
10 hours ago, 00:05
@StandardMedia - By: Dalton Nyabundi
New jetty enhances Kisumu’s fortunes in regional oil trade

Sh1.7b facility will enable transportation of the commodity across Lake Victoria ...

Category: business news
13 hours ago, 21:06
@DailyNation - By: Isaiah Esipisu
A case for revival of 4K Clubs in schools

Most public schools have land making it easier to teach pupils how to farm. ...

Category: business news
13 hours ago, 21:05
@DailyNation - By: Rachel Kibui
Tips on value addition and machinery from the farm expo

These technologies were on display at the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (Kalro) Naivasha centre. ...

Category: topnews news business
11 hours ago, 23:58
@TheStar - By: Elizabeth Kivuva ...
Excise tax bad for war on fakes

The high level of excise taxes on manufactured or imported goods into the country is likely to drive up illicit trade. Kenya Investment Authority managing director Moses Kihara said high excise duty w ...

Category: business news
10 hours ago, 00:05
@StandardMedia - By: Otiato Guguyu
Treasury PS gives public little time to probe finances

Kenyans get only one day to submit comments on budget outlook paper. ...

Category: business news

@StandardMedia

Kenya's Nairobi looks for new water to ease its growing thirst

3 months ago, 13 June 12:00

By: Reuters

When last year’s prolonged drought saw the water supply to Damaris Kiarie’s Nairobi home rationed, she decided her best bet was to buy water from a local vendor.

It was, she soon learned, a mistake.

After storing two 20-litre drums of water in her kitchen, her son came home from school and poured himself a cup, she remembers.

But “when I arrived home from work, I found him complaining of stomach pains. Within one hour he had diarrhoea.”

She took the 7-year-old to a nearby hospital where medical staff diagnosed cholera, and successfully treated him for it. After that, Kiarie bought a large tank that can store 1,000 litres of piped water for emergency use.

Kiarie said contaminated water causes at least two cases of cholera every month in her neighborhood. Residents of other parts of Kenya’s capital face similar problems, battling shortages caused by drought and broken pipes.

Added to that are the water cartels that tap illegally into the water mains, siphoning off water that they then sell to residents. That water can easily become contaminated.

In short, Nairobi lacks sufficient water, particularly in an era where climate change is bringing less predictable rains.

“When there is a water shortage it is our children who suffer the most. It is good for our leaders to look for alternative sources of water,” said Kiarie.

CAPITAL PROBLEM

Nairobi’s main water source is the Ndakaini dam, which lies about 50 kilometres (30 miles) north of the capital. It supplies about 85 percent of the 500 million litres of water the city uses each day, said Nahashon Muguna, who heads the Nairobi City Water and Sewerage Company.

However, Muguna said, demand is much higher: around 700 million litres. Not surprisingly, residents such as Kiarie wonder what can be done to close the gap.

To that end, the capital is diversifying its sources of water, Nairobi governor Mike Mbuvi Sonko told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“This can help remove cartels who have taken over water businesses in the city,” he said.

Ensuring residents have access to enough water would remove demand for the cartels’ supply, he said.

One solution is to rehabilitate a series of nearby wetlands, dams and swamps both inside and outside the city, and pump the water to the capital. That is something the government is working on together with donors and the private sector.

Many freshwater wetlands have become polluted or have been encroached on over the years.

Previous efforts to improve water systems for Nairobi have included a $35 million rehabiliation of rivers in the Nairobi area, and the improvement of the Nairobi dam as part of a regeneration project in the capital’s infamous Kibera slum.

Although some of the water being brought in is not fit as drinking water, it could be used for sewerage, construction and irrigation, said Nixon Korir, a member of parliament for Lang’ata, a suburb in the capital.

“This can help reduce the amount of fresh water used for enterprises, and increase the volumes families can ...
Read More

Category: business news

Suggested

13 hours ago, 21:05
@DailyNation - By: Brian Moke Ogaro ...
Steps to becoming an organic grower

To shift to organic farming, there is usually a transition period of 36 months prior to harvesting the first crop that can be labelled as organic. ...

Category: topnews news business
10 hours ago, 00:05
@StandardMedia - By: Dalton Nyabundi
New jetty enhances Kisumu’s fortunes in regional oil trade

Sh1.7b facility will enable transportation of the commodity across Lake Victoria ...

Category: business news
13 hours ago, 21:06
@DailyNation - By: Isaiah Esipisu
A case for revival of 4K Clubs in schools

Most public schools have land making it easier to teach pupils how to farm. ...

Category: business news
13 hours ago, 21:05
@DailyNation - By: Rachel Kibui
Tips on value addition and machinery from the farm expo

These technologies were on display at the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organisation (Kalro) Naivasha centre. ...

Category: topnews news business
11 hours ago, 23:58
@TheStar - By: Elizabeth Kivuva ...
Excise tax bad for war on fakes

The high level of excise taxes on manufactured or imported goods into the country is likely to drive up illicit trade. Kenya Investment Authority managing director Moses Kihara said high excise duty w ...

Category: business news
10 hours ago, 00:05
@StandardMedia - By: Otiato Guguyu
Treasury PS gives public little time to probe finances

Kenyans get only one day to submit comments on budget outlook paper. ...

Category: business news
Our App