@StandardMedia

How medical negligence is robbing families of loved ones

3 weeks ago, 00:07

By: Osman Mohamed Osma ...

Inside the quiet intensive care unit at a top private hospital in Nairobi, Awino Okech held her mother’s hand, weeping silently.

It was about 4pm and Ms Awino, a lecturer at the London School of Oriental and African Studies, had only a few minutes to see her mother, Dolphine.

From the hospital bed, Dolphine, wearing a sky-blue hospital gown, an oxygen mask strapped to her face, struggled to speak.

“I am not feeling well,” she whispered, trying to pull off the mask.

That was December 15, 2010.

The 64-year-old patient had been admitted at the hospital three days before for a three-hour operation to remove her uterus to stop further spread of cervical cancer.

Dolphine’s symptoms had appeared eight months earlier in Kisumu County. She had a series of medical tests done that confirmed that she had the early stages of cervical cancer.

She then travelled to Nairobi where doctors confirmed the cancer and recommended that she should seek immediate treatment.  

“Since she was in her sixties, we agreed that an operation to remove her uterus would be best for her,” said Awino.

On December 11, 2010, a day before the scheduled surgery, Awino and her siblings drove their mother to a private hospital in Nairobi for admission. 

On December 12, Dolphine was wheeled into theatre for the surgery. Her family waited outside the theatre for hours.

At 11 o’clock, she was wheeled out and transferred to the surgical ward. On the third day, she was allowed to eat.

Then everything started to go south. That night, shortly after she had been allowed to eat, Dolphine developed complications. She had trouble breathing and her blood pressure plummeted.

But it wasn’t until the afternoon, when her breathing became more laboured, that she was transferred to the intensive care unit.

A day later, at around 11pm, when other patients were drifting away to sleep, Dolphine breathed her last.

Doctors at the hospital told the family she died of a bacterial infection. But Awino and her siblings were not satisfied with this explanation and demanded an autopsy with an independent pathologist present.

The outcome showed that Dolphine did indeed die of a bacterial infection. But that was not all.

The autopsy also found out that the infection had been caused by tiny holes in the intestines - they were punctured during the surgery.

This meant that the contents of her intestines had started leaking into her bloodstream, effectively poisoning her.

On further review of Dolphine’s medical records, the family discovered that there was a close to six-hour window in which she could have have been taken back to theatre to save her life.

“There was every sign that my mother’s death could have been prevented if the doctors responded swiftly when she began complaining of discomfort on the night of December 13,” said Awino. 

The family filed a complaint at the Kenya’s Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board (KMPDB). The process of filing was far from easy.

First, the patient or his or her kin is required to lodge ...
Read More


Category: topnews news

Suggested

6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Dominic Omondi
‘Black Friday’ sales to increase e-commerce penetration

Kenya’s e-commerce penetration is expected to rise dramatically as consumers rush online to purchase items on offer in November. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Jacob Ng'etich
Illegal gas traders put Kenyans at risk

Cases of accidents occasioned by poor handling of gas cylinders that are worn out and the illegal gas operators have been on the increase. ...

Category: topnews news
10 hours ago, 20:40
@DailyNation - By: Karen Mbuya Muriu ...
ONE ON ONE: Mwende Macharia

Esther Mwende Macharia is a radio host. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Jacob Ng’etich
Why the premier post is a hot potato in referendum debate

Already even before the seat is birthed, there is heightening anxiety over who could be the beneficiary of the position if it is created ...

Category: topnews news
4 hours ago, 03:00
@StandardMedia - By: Paul Wafula
Future tech: From flying cars to police robots and bots that can sing and play piano

A flying car powered by UAE’s telecom operator Etisalat stunned thousands of technology innovators at the latest exhibition in Dubai. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Otiato Guguyu
What awaits Kenya in migration to new generation currency

UK printing firm De La Rue has been cleared by court to print bank notes ...

Category: topnews news

@StandardMedia

How medical negligence is robbing families of loved ones

3 weeks ago, 00:07

By: Osman Mohamed Osma ...

Inside the quiet intensive care unit at a top private hospital in Nairobi, Awino Okech held her mother’s hand, weeping silently.

It was about 4pm and Ms Awino, a lecturer at the London School of Oriental and African Studies, had only a few minutes to see her mother, Dolphine.

From the hospital bed, Dolphine, wearing a sky-blue hospital gown, an oxygen mask strapped to her face, struggled to speak.

“I am not feeling well,” she whispered, trying to pull off the mask.

That was December 15, 2010.

The 64-year-old patient had been admitted at the hospital three days before for a three-hour operation to remove her uterus to stop further spread of cervical cancer.

Dolphine’s symptoms had appeared eight months earlier in Kisumu County. She had a series of medical tests done that confirmed that she had the early stages of cervical cancer.

She then travelled to Nairobi where doctors confirmed the cancer and recommended that she should seek immediate treatment.  

“Since she was in her sixties, we agreed that an operation to remove her uterus would be best for her,” said Awino.

On December 11, 2010, a day before the scheduled surgery, Awino and her siblings drove their mother to a private hospital in Nairobi for admission. 

On December 12, Dolphine was wheeled into theatre for the surgery. Her family waited outside the theatre for hours.

At 11 o’clock, she was wheeled out and transferred to the surgical ward. On the third day, she was allowed to eat.

Then everything started to go south. That night, shortly after she had been allowed to eat, Dolphine developed complications. She had trouble breathing and her blood pressure plummeted.

But it wasn’t until the afternoon, when her breathing became more laboured, that she was transferred to the intensive care unit.

A day later, at around 11pm, when other patients were drifting away to sleep, Dolphine breathed her last.

Doctors at the hospital told the family she died of a bacterial infection. But Awino and her siblings were not satisfied with this explanation and demanded an autopsy with an independent pathologist present.

The outcome showed that Dolphine did indeed die of a bacterial infection. But that was not all.

The autopsy also found out that the infection had been caused by tiny holes in the intestines - they were punctured during the surgery.

This meant that the contents of her intestines had started leaking into her bloodstream, effectively poisoning her.

On further review of Dolphine’s medical records, the family discovered that there was a close to six-hour window in which she could have have been taken back to theatre to save her life.

“There was every sign that my mother’s death could have been prevented if the doctors responded swiftly when she began complaining of discomfort on the night of December 13,” said Awino. 

The family filed a complaint at the Kenya’s Medical Practitioners and Dentists Board (KMPDB). The process of filing was far from easy.

First, the patient or his or her kin is required to lodge ...
Read More

Category: topnews news

Suggested

6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Dominic Omondi
‘Black Friday’ sales to increase e-commerce penetration

Kenya’s e-commerce penetration is expected to rise dramatically as consumers rush online to purchase items on offer in November. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Jacob Ng'etich
Illegal gas traders put Kenyans at risk

Cases of accidents occasioned by poor handling of gas cylinders that are worn out and the illegal gas operators have been on the increase. ...

Category: topnews news
10 hours ago, 20:40
@DailyNation - By: Karen Mbuya Muriu ...
ONE ON ONE: Mwende Macharia

Esther Mwende Macharia is a radio host. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Jacob Ng’etich
Why the premier post is a hot potato in referendum debate

Already even before the seat is birthed, there is heightening anxiety over who could be the beneficiary of the position if it is created ...

Category: topnews news
4 hours ago, 03:00
@StandardMedia - By: Paul Wafula
Future tech: From flying cars to police robots and bots that can sing and play piano

A flying car powered by UAE’s telecom operator Etisalat stunned thousands of technology innovators at the latest exhibition in Dubai. ...

Category: topnews news
6 hours ago, 00:06
@StandardMedia - By: Otiato Guguyu
What awaits Kenya in migration to new generation currency

UK printing firm De La Rue has been cleared by court to print bank notes ...

Category: topnews news
Our App