@TheEastAfrican

GALLERIES: Proving a point in black and white…

4 months ago, 20 July 15:09

By: Frank Whalley

You can say a lot with a little, and happily two current exhibitions just a few kilometres apart prove that point.

One is of paintings the other of drawings, but in each case the only colours used are black and white.

Ok, so black is actually the absence of any colour and white the product of all colours merged, as a children’s whizz wheel will prove, but leaving pedantry aside both exhibitions demonstrate the versatility and range that can be wrought from such a restricted palette.

Interestingly, the artists, Churchill Ongere and Samuel Githui, both add an extra dimension by choosing coincidentally to work on coloured paper; black for Ongere’s paintings and brown for the drawings by Githui.

Ongere also augments his paintings with the traces of netting, handfuls of gravel, leaves and bizarrely, a few bananas.

Fifteen of his wondrous works can be seen at the Red Hill Art Gallery off the road to Limuru, where owners Hellmuth and Erica Rossler-Musch have arranged their usual impeccable hang… lots of space between the paintings, all at eye level, and the numbering and other information present but discreet.

In an exhibition called Suspensions, Ongere offers everyday objects — stools, chairs, open boxes and those bananas — as objects of art; metaphors for uncertainty, chaos and even violence as they float, swirl and tumble across the picture plane.

Specifically, the open boxes represent portals of many possibilities; anything could come out of them.

Picked out in white ink, they dance against a cleverly worked background of more commonplace objects laid on the paper and then spray painted, revealing the shadows of their presence like reversed stencils.

Thus broken chairs fall like snowflakes across the richly textured background of scattered shapes of gravel, a stool sinks upended over a pattern of leaves, and an open box floats over a shifting sea of bananas.

Bananas? Why bananas? Ongere explains, “I was trying to introduce something innocent in an environment that was violent and disturbed, to restore its purity.”

If it is true that artists’ fame can be measured in part by the extent to which their ideas and techniques inspire others, then Kenyans Peterson Kamwathi and Willie Wambugu have even more reasons to be satisfied.

The concept of floating objects indicating uncertainty and chaos was expressed by Kamwathi in his ongoing Constellation and Sediment series.

It was he too who pioneered in East Africa the idea of spray painting his backgrounds through, for example, pieces of lace.

And it was Wambugu who in a succession of exhibitions elevated household goods like keys, sofas and garden tools into objects of art… an idea owed originally, I think, to the American Jim Dine with his etchings of bolt cutters, hammers and spanners.

Also working in black and white is Samuel Githui who is showing 400 drawings — yes, 400 — at the Circle Gallery in Lavington, Nairobi under the title Transformations.

They are of the Kenyan dancer Kefa Oiro caught sequentially in performance as he moved in and out of light.

They present rather like stills from a film recording his movement, ...
Read More


Category: magazine news

Suggested

3 hours ago, 14:50
@Zumi - By: Nicole Waireri
Ladies! Here Is A Cool Trick That Will Make Your Braids Last Longer

. Sometimes the itching starts as soon as you get your hair done but there's a hair trick to avoid that annoying discomfort! ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:34
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Bahati And Diana Marua's Baby Heaven Is Out Here Looking Stylish

We have seen Diana Marua and Bahati all over the internet because of various things. But have you seen their adorable daughter, Heaven Bahati? ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:22
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Ladies! Here Are 4 Hats You Need To Look Fly On Your Holiday

Whether you are going to the coast or to the Alps, we have you covered ladies! With hats, you can look stylish while covering your hair. ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:11
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Kagwe Mungai Becomes Brand Ambassador For Aramanda Fashion

Kagwe Mungai is clearly making moves this year! He just got announced as the Aramanda fashion line brand ambassador and we are proud of him. ...

Category: magazine zumi women
5 hours ago, 13:39
@Zumi - By: Philip Etemesi
"I Am Not A Woman Eater", Jowie Writes Letter Addressing Judge

Joseph Irungu alias Jowie has come out to bash Justice James Wakiaga for calling him a woman eater.In a letter to the Judicial Service Commission ...

Category: magazine zumi women
6 hours ago, 12:31
@Zumi - By: Philip Etemesi
Niwacheni! Here's Tedd Josiah's Response To People Asking Him To Remarry

He is tired of hearing it.This past year has been full of pain for Tedd Josiah but he has always found joy in his daughter Jay aka Gummy Bear. ...

Category: magazine zumi women

@TheEastAfrican

GALLERIES: Proving a point in black and white…

4 months ago, 20 July 15:09

By: Frank Whalley

You can say a lot with a little, and happily two current exhibitions just a few kilometres apart prove that point.

One is of paintings the other of drawings, but in each case the only colours used are black and white.

Ok, so black is actually the absence of any colour and white the product of all colours merged, as a children’s whizz wheel will prove, but leaving pedantry aside both exhibitions demonstrate the versatility and range that can be wrought from such a restricted palette.

Interestingly, the artists, Churchill Ongere and Samuel Githui, both add an extra dimension by choosing coincidentally to work on coloured paper; black for Ongere’s paintings and brown for the drawings by Githui.

Ongere also augments his paintings with the traces of netting, handfuls of gravel, leaves and bizarrely, a few bananas.

Fifteen of his wondrous works can be seen at the Red Hill Art Gallery off the road to Limuru, where owners Hellmuth and Erica Rossler-Musch have arranged their usual impeccable hang… lots of space between the paintings, all at eye level, and the numbering and other information present but discreet.

In an exhibition called Suspensions, Ongere offers everyday objects — stools, chairs, open boxes and those bananas — as objects of art; metaphors for uncertainty, chaos and even violence as they float, swirl and tumble across the picture plane.

Specifically, the open boxes represent portals of many possibilities; anything could come out of them.

Picked out in white ink, they dance against a cleverly worked background of more commonplace objects laid on the paper and then spray painted, revealing the shadows of their presence like reversed stencils.

Thus broken chairs fall like snowflakes across the richly textured background of scattered shapes of gravel, a stool sinks upended over a pattern of leaves, and an open box floats over a shifting sea of bananas.

Bananas? Why bananas? Ongere explains, “I was trying to introduce something innocent in an environment that was violent and disturbed, to restore its purity.”

If it is true that artists’ fame can be measured in part by the extent to which their ideas and techniques inspire others, then Kenyans Peterson Kamwathi and Willie Wambugu have even more reasons to be satisfied.

The concept of floating objects indicating uncertainty and chaos was expressed by Kamwathi in his ongoing Constellation and Sediment series.

It was he too who pioneered in East Africa the idea of spray painting his backgrounds through, for example, pieces of lace.

And it was Wambugu who in a succession of exhibitions elevated household goods like keys, sofas and garden tools into objects of art… an idea owed originally, I think, to the American Jim Dine with his etchings of bolt cutters, hammers and spanners.

Also working in black and white is Samuel Githui who is showing 400 drawings — yes, 400 — at the Circle Gallery in Lavington, Nairobi under the title Transformations.

They are of the Kenyan dancer Kefa Oiro caught sequentially in performance as he moved in and out of light.

They present rather like stills from a film recording his movement, ...
Read More

Category: magazine news

Suggested

3 hours ago, 14:50
@Zumi - By: Nicole Waireri
Ladies! Here Is A Cool Trick That Will Make Your Braids Last Longer

. Sometimes the itching starts as soon as you get your hair done but there's a hair trick to avoid that annoying discomfort! ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:34
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Bahati And Diana Marua's Baby Heaven Is Out Here Looking Stylish

We have seen Diana Marua and Bahati all over the internet because of various things. But have you seen their adorable daughter, Heaven Bahati? ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:22
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Ladies! Here Are 4 Hats You Need To Look Fly On Your Holiday

Whether you are going to the coast or to the Alps, we have you covered ladies! With hats, you can look stylish while covering your hair. ...

Category: magazine zumi women
4 hours ago, 14:11
@Zumi - By: Nicole Kirui
Kagwe Mungai Becomes Brand Ambassador For Aramanda Fashion

Kagwe Mungai is clearly making moves this year! He just got announced as the Aramanda fashion line brand ambassador and we are proud of him. ...

Category: magazine zumi women
5 hours ago, 13:39
@Zumi - By: Philip Etemesi
"I Am Not A Woman Eater", Jowie Writes Letter Addressing Judge

Joseph Irungu alias Jowie has come out to bash Justice James Wakiaga for calling him a woman eater.In a letter to the Judicial Service Commission ...

Category: magazine zumi women
6 hours ago, 12:31
@Zumi - By: Philip Etemesi
Niwacheni! Here's Tedd Josiah's Response To People Asking Him To Remarry

He is tired of hearing it.This past year has been full of pain for Tedd Josiah but he has always found joy in his daughter Jay aka Gummy Bear. ...

Category: magazine zumi women
Our App